The past, present and future of oral storytelling

NPR's Christopher Joyce explains why oral storytelling is here to stay. Photo by Rich Press
NPR’s Christopher Joyce explains why oral storytelling is here to stay. Photo by Rich Press
By Joy Ng

DCSWA is an organization of talented science communicators who take jargon-ridden science research and transform it into something comprehensible and compelling. A communicator’s tool of choice can vary among written words, sounds and images. As communicators, we know that with whichever medium we choose, it is the stories we tell that connect with people. Stories are full of “ah hah, I get it!” moments, leaving readers, listeners or watchers with a resounding sense of satisfaction.

From Homer to This American Life, oral storytelling is a medium that has stood the test of time. Some say its future is bright as well. What makes it so timeless? How does storytelling through sound differ from storytelling with written words and images?

To get an expert’s perspective on the power of oral storytelling, I spoke with Christopher Joyce, a science correspondent at NPR and a plenary speaker at DCSWA’s 2015 Professional Development Day.

Listen to my interview with Joyce on SoundCloud

See all PDD 2015 highlights